• Should You Join the Editorial Freelancers Association? 5 Factors to Consider
    by Evan Jensen on October 15, 2021 at 1:00 pm

    Have you heard of the Editorial Freelancers Association? It’s an organization that’s been around for more than 40 years, created to help connect writers and creatives. Because the truth is, writing often feels like a lonely endeavor. You know, like you’re in the middle of a deserted island. And the only people you really talk… Read more »

  • NaNoWriMo Prep: Planning Your Novel’s Middle
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 15, 2021 at 10:00 am

    By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy Continuing with the annual NaNo prep posts…we dive into the turning points and problems of writing your novel’s middle.Middles might be the most common tough spot for writers, and with good reason. The middle makes up half the novel, and it’s where all the heavy plot workings happen. We usually have a decent idea of how our stories start, and roughly how they end, but that middle? What do we put in there? That often eludes us.This is when a lot of novels start to bog down, so there’s a good chance many NaNo writers will stumble here. But don’t worry, because I know a great trick to overcome middle woes. The Mid-Point Reversal! This is a major event that happens in the middle of your novel that helps bridge the gap between the end of the beginning and the beginning of the end (act one and […]

  • Inciting Incident: Definition, Examples, Types, and How to Start a Story Right
    by Joe Bunting on October 14, 2021 at 12:00 pm

    The article Inciting Incident: Definition, Examples, Types, and How to Start a Story Right appeared first on The Write Practice. If you are planning on writing a story, there is something you need to consider besides basic plot structure. You need to determine your Inciting Incident. What incident will compel your protagonist to act, prompting them to move through a meaningful story? Let’s take a look at what an inciting incident is and how to write one. The article Inciting Incident: Definition, Examples, Types, and How to Start a Story Right appeared first on The Write Practice. The Write Practice – The Online Writing Workbook

  • The Importance of Commas, Meter, and Reading Aloud for the Fiction Writer
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 14, 2021 at 10:00 am

    By Dario Ciriello, @Dario_Ciriello Part of the How They Do It SeriesJH: How your writing sounds is just as important as how it reads. Dario Ciriello discusses how rhythm and meter work to create memorable writing.I recently completed an edit for a client, Cordia Pearson1, whom I’d gently persuaded to let me introduce Oxford commas into her list phrases. The reasoning for this is that using the Oxford (aka serial) comma never does any harm, and can prevent serious confusion. Consider the sentence, My parents, Jesus, and Lady Gaga taught me all I know. If you remove the serial comma after Jesus, the meaning changes, and not for the better. Continue ReadingWritten by Janice Hardy. Fiction-University.com

  • A Show-Don’t-Tell Database for Writers
    by ANGELA ACKERMAN on October 14, 2021 at 8:03 am

    One thing we’re known for around here is description. For a dozen years, Becca and I have explored topic after topic, and whether it’s settings, emotions, backstory wounds, conflict, weather, or something else, we dive in and find all the ways this storytelling element can be leveraged via show-not-tell to improve your book and the The post A Show-Don’t-Tell Database for Writers appeared first on WRITERS HELPING WRITERS®.

  • Writers: How to Tell the Future
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 13, 2021 at 1:08 pm

    By R.W. W. Greene, @rwwgreene Part of the How They Do It Series JH: One of science fiction’s strengths is showing future possibilities and what life might be like in them. R.W.W. Greene shares tips on how to create plausible (and intriguing) futures. R.W. W. Greene is the author of The Light Years and Twenty-Five to Life, on bookshelves now via Angry Robot Books. He is represented by Sara Megibow of the KT Literary Agency. Website | Goodreads | Twitter | InstagramTake it away RWW… Continue ReadingWritten by Janice Hardy. Fiction-University.com

  • In Medias Res: Definition and Examples That Start a Story in the Middle
    by Liz Bureman on October 13, 2021 at 12:00 pm

    The article In Medias Res: Definition and Examples That Start a Story in the Middle appeared first on The Write Practice. One way to tell a story is to introduce the reader to the environment of the story. Descriptions of foliage and dirt roads, or of skyscrapers and clanging subway gears, can get the reader acclimated to the setting and can be a way to introduce the protagonist as a product of their surroundings. But sometimes you just don’t have the patience for that. You want to hit the ground with the plot running at full speed, and once you’ve gotten the reader’s attention and piqued their curiosity, then maybe you explain what’s going on and how things got here. Welcome to the world of in medias res. The article In Medias Res: Definition and Examples That Start a Story in the Middle appeared first on The Write Practice. […]

  • 13 Tips for Writing a Halloween Story
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 12, 2021 at 12:13 pm

    By Rayne Hall, @RayneHallPart of the Focus on Short Fiction SeriesJH: Drawing inspiration from holidays is a great way to spark a new story. Rayne Hall shares 13 tips for writing a Halloween tale.A Halloween story has two characteristics: it must unfold on or around the time of Halloween, and it must be scary in some way. Here are some ideas and tips for creating your own scary Halloween story. 1. The story features a Halloween ritual – but not necessarily a predictable one. The story plot needs to involve Halloween customs or rituals. However, these don’t need to be the conventional trick-or-treating, carved pumpkins and fancy-dress costumes. Consider the seasonal traditions of other cultures, regions and religions and draw on them for inspiration. Continue ReadingWritten by Janice Hardy. Fiction-University.com

  • 8 Basic SEO Tips Every Freelancer Should Know
    by Jeremy Anderberg on October 12, 2021 at 5:58 am

    As a freelance writer, you are typically not required to be an SEO expert. And, depending on the client you work with, you may not even have an SEO conversation with them. After all, you can write compelling and engaging content for online publications without even knowing what these three letters stand for, much less… Read more »

  • Release Day: The Conflict Thesaurus Is Here!
    by ANGELA ACKERMAN on October 12, 2021 at 4:01 am

    Well, guys – another book is out in the world! The Conflict Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Obstacles, Adversaries, and Inner Struggles (Volume 1) is a game-changer for writers, screenwriters, game designers, and anyone else who needs a steady stream of ideas on how to challenge their characters inside and out. Conflict is a big The post Release Day: The Conflict Thesaurus Is Here! appeared first on WRITERS HELPING WRITERS®.

  • Subtext Examples: 7 Simple Techniques to Supercharge Your Scenes
    by Joslyn Chase on October 11, 2021 at 1:00 pm

    The article Subtext Examples: 7 Simple Techniques to Supercharge Your Scenes appeared first on The Write Practice. As writers, we are always working to make our stories the best they can be. One of the more advanced techniques that can help you do this is by giving an underlying meaning in a scene—otherwise known as subtext.  In a story, subtext  can be implied by the surface action and dialogue. When you think about the books and stories that you most enjoyed reading, chances are that story’s scenes were woven with something deeper than what appeared on the surface. Today I’d like to teach you seven simple techniques for using subtext in your story, which I’ll also teach with some subtext examples.  The article Subtext Examples: 7 Simple Techniques to Supercharge Your Scenes appeared first on The Write Practice. The […]

  • How Far is Too Far? How Narrative Distance Affects Telling
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 11, 2021 at 10:00 am

    By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy There can be a fine line between a far narrative distance and telling. Not all points of view use the same narrative distance. A first-person point of view pulls readers in close, while an omniscient point of view keeps them at a distance. Both are valid narrative distances, but the farther away you get from the reader, the riskier it is you’ll slip up and start telling instead of showing. Maybe you pull away from the narrative for style, or because you want to show more than just what the point of view character knows. Maybe you aren’t comfortable inside a character’s head and don’t yet know what’s going on in there. Or maybe your point-of-view-skills are still a little shaky and you don’t even realize you’re doing it—until your get feedback with comments such as “this feels […]

  • 7 Ways to Create an Empathetic Antagonist
    by cslakin on October 11, 2021 at 7:22 am

    Today’s guest post is by Sarah Tinsley. “Complexity is an indispensable ingredient of life, and so it ought to be with the characters we create in our stories”— Stavros Halvatzis Everyone loves a good antagonist. From the Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin Hood to Cersei in A Game of Thrones, there’s nothing more appealing than The post 7 Ways to Create an Empathetic Antagonist first appeared on Live Write Thrive.

  • WIP Diagnostic: Is This Working? A Closer Look at Writing a Non-Human POV
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 9, 2021 at 10:41 am

    Critique by Maria D’Marco WIP Diagnostics is a weekly column that studies a snippet of a work in progress for specific issues. Readers are encouraged to send in work with questions, and we diagnose it on the site. It’s part critique, part example, and designed to help the submitter as well as anyone else having a similar problem. If you’re interested in submitting to WIP Diagnostics, please check out these guidelines. Submissions currently in the queue: SevenPlease Note: As of today, critique slots are booked through November 27. This week’s questions:1. Does this opening work to hook the reader?2. Does it establish the “alien” POV of the protagonist?3. Does it establish the initial conflict and goal? 4. Does it need to be clear to the reader that this is a lab if the protagonist does not understand that […]

  • Points of a Story: 6 Key Plot Points That Every Story Needs
    by Joe Bunting on October 8, 2021 at 4:41 pm

    The article Points of a Story: 6 Key Plot Points That Every Story Needs appeared first on The Write Practice. One thing writers have told me consistently is that knowing story structure and the major plot points—or points of a story—makes writing great stories easier. But what are the main points of a story? How can you get them into your books? I’ve personally found story structure to be incredibly helpful, not just in writing novels and screenplays, but also in memoir and even, sometimes, writing nonfiction books. In this guide, we’re going to talk about the basic points of a story and how to use story structure to make your writing easier and more effective. I’ll share the six major plot points and talk about a few other points you might look for when writing a book that will give you a general roadmap to writing your […]

  • NaNoWriMo Prep: Planning Your Novel’s Beginning
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 8, 2021 at 10:00 am

    By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy Many writers know what they want to write about, but have no idea where to start.For many, the beginning of a novel is the hardest part. Getting the right opening scene, finding the right inciting event, even figuring out the perfect first sentence can keep you from getting anywhere at all. But don’t worry.  Beginnings aren’t as scary as they appear.In many ways, they’re the easier part, since you probably already know the most critical aspects of your story–the protagonist, the goal, the conflict, and the setting.If you’re not yet sure on what to put in your novel’s beginning, let’s take a closer peek at what goes into a beginning. Continue ReadingWritten by Janice Hardy. Fiction-University.com

  • Money Mindset for Writers: 3 Mindset Shifts to Help You Find More Joy and Profit in Your Work (Part 2)
    by Make A Living Writing on October 8, 2021 at 6:00 am

    Editor’s Note: This is Part 2 of a guest article by Austin Church. Read Part I here. In Part I of this article on money mindset, we went through what money scripts are, where they come from, and the first most common money script that writers hold. Here in Part II, we’ll go through the… Read more »

  • Placing Short Fiction, Part Two: Contests and Red Flags
    by noreply@blogger.com (Janice Hardy) on October 7, 2021 at 12:14 pm

    By José Pablo Iriarte, @LabyrinthRatPart of the Focus on Short Fiction SeriesJH: Contests can be a great way to get your writing out there, but be wary of those who take advantage of writers. José Pablo Iriarte shares some red flags that a publisher doesn’t have your best interests in mind.In my last guest post, I talked in general terms about selling short fiction, focusing on considerations such as how to find a market, how much pay rate might matter to you, how to format manuscripts, print versus online markets, and magazines versus anthologies. In my mind, the theme was You’ve finished you story . . . now what? As I said in July, though, there was really too much I wanted to say to be able to fit in one post, so now I’m back with more thoughts on what to do—or what not to do—with your short work. Today the focus is […]

  • NaNoWriMo Prep for Plotters & Pantsers
    by ANGELA ACKERMAN on October 7, 2021 at 8:22 am

    It’s October, meaning many writers are turning their thoughts to NaNoWriMo, (National Novel Writing Month) starting November 1st, when they will attempt to write 50,000 words in a month. NaNoWriMo is a great time to lock up your internal editor and let creativity take the wheel. But unfortunately for most writers, it can be a The post NaNoWriMo Prep for Plotters & Pantsers appeared first on WRITERS HELPING WRITERS®.

  • The Ordinary World: The First Step in the Hero’s Journey
    by David Safford on October 5, 2021 at 1:00 pm

    The article The Ordinary World: The First Step in the Hero’s Journey appeared first on The Write Practice. Have you heard the story of the orphan boy living in the cupboard under the stairs? Or perhaps the story of the girl in District 12 (the crappiest District) who would not only survive an unwinnable deathmatch, but become a symbol of liberty? Maybe you’ve heard of the baby boy who was going to die in a mass genocide, but whose mother put him in a basket and sent him down the Nile River . . . If you didn’t catch those, here they are in order: Harry Potter, Katniss Everdeen (The Hunger Games), and . . . Moses. And all these stories follow the same classic story structure. The article The Ordinary World: The First Step in the Hero’s Journey appeared first on The Write Practice. The Write Practice – The Online Writing […]